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Lesson Plan: Odd or Even? The Addition and Complement Principles of Probability

(Grades 9-12+) Originally published November 2015, this lesson engages students in an exploration activity and a class discussion. After completing this lesson, students will be able to determine when events are mutually exclusive, and then use the Addition Principle to calculate the probability of mutually exclusive and non-mutually exclusive events.

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Announcements: Winter

A roundup of statistics and education-related information.

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Why 0.05? Two Examples That Put Students in the Role of Decision Maker

Any teacher of Introductory Statistics has heard this question more times than they can remember: “Why 0.05?” Here, the value 0.05 refers to the significance level in a hypothesis test. I provide a brief review of the concepts of hypothesis test and significance level. Then, I describe two activities for teachers to proactively address the question of why 0.05 with their students.

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Lesson Plan: You Will Soon Analyze Categorical Data (Classifying Fortune Cookie Fortunes)

(Grades 9-12+) Originally published in May 2014, students will have the opportunity to collect and explore real data using two brands of fortune cookies.

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Double Stuffed?

The question of whether Double Stuf Oreos actually have double the filling is an intriguing one. In this article, I describe an activity that uses that question as a hook to engage students in finding means, comparing distributions, and performing t-tests.

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Lesson Plan: What Fits?

(Grades 6-12+) Originally published in February 2013, this activity has students explore what a line of best fit is and where a line of best fit should be placed on a scatterplot of data with a linear association.

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Lesson Plan: Bubble Trouble!

(Grades 6-12+) Originally published in May 2014, this lesson has two goals: have students generate data and calculate descriptive statistics to describe the distribution of a sample drawn from a random process and compare trials from different experiments and use them to make some judgment about the underlying processes.

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Helping Community College Math Instructors Teach Statistics Effectively

We are reaching a crisis at community colleges across the country. The number of STEM majors (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) has dramatically decreased, while the number of non-STEM majors continues to rise. At my college alone, only about 30% of our students are STEM majors.

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Editors’ Note: Winter

Welcome back to school! It’s so much fun to see photos and hear of back-to-school stories, which seem to take place from July through the end of September in the United States! I hope this edition of the Statistics Teacher Network finds you well, back in the groove of your classroom, and that it contributes to your statistical teaching this year.

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Lesson Plan: Confidence in Salaries in Petroleum Engineering

(Grades 9-12+) Originally published in October 2016, this lesson introduces students to bootstrapping methods for making inferences about a population parameter using a randomly selected sample from the population.

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